Watercolor

I never thought blue eyes could actually change color. It depends on where he is and what he does. If he’s pissed, it looks almost dark gray. If you catch him outdoors, his eyes turn a lovely shade of pale blue. When he’s in front of the pool, it becomes a reflection of the water – sea blue. Amazing.

All eyes fall on this slender, black mother when she enters a room. She has a presence that exudes with confidence and grace. She walks like a queen surveying her domain. Pragmatic, protective and powerfully aware of who she is and what she can do. I am not satisfied with how I’ve painted her image. I will do another...

I realized one thing – do you need to learn patience? Watercolor is the best teacher. You can’t just paint everything in one go. One waits. You can’t wait too long for the paint to dry because the effect would be different. You can’t put on too much paint while it is damp because the water would diffuse...

I know I have to work on both the likeness and how to make it ‘softer’. Still practising. 🙂

I thought doing pets would be easier. After all – they don’t have wrinkles. Ha! Granted that I need to learn how to do fur, I think I learned how to do gradient colors by doing my friend’s yellow labrador.   These are photos of Joaqui when he was younger:      

This portrait was based on a photo I took of Gems in Cucina Rusticana. It was afternoon and there was a thin sliver of sunlight that lighted the room. It fell on her face as she talked. When she was worrying about how things were. I took a pic and captured that moment. I never thought I’d be using it as basis for this...

It all started when my brother asked me to do a portrait of his friend. He didn’t want a digital one. He wanted something tangible. A ‘real’ artwork. That’s what pushed me to pick up the brush and do watercolor portraits. I can’t get these thoughts out of my mind. It’s like I’m gripped with a fever and I’m too...

My cat has the habit of sitting next to me as I work. It is very distracting. I wouldn’t budge. She would squirm and squeeze herself into place until she falls asleep. When I’d get up to take a break, she’d follow me out of the room and into the kitchen. Once she’s distracted, I’d go back to my room and work in peace. But...